Speech Therapy

Speech Therapy

Speech-language therapy is designed to coordinate the mechanics of speech with the meaning and social use of language. Such a program begins with an individual evaluation by a speech-language pathologist to assess an individual's verbal aptitudes and challenges. From this evaluation, the pathologist sets goals that may include mastering spoken language and/or learning nonverbal communication skills such as signs or gestures. In each case, the goal is to help the person communicate in more useful and functional ways. The speech language pathologist can provide therapy one-on-one, in a small group or in a classroom setting. Therapists who work with children have additional specialized training. Augmentative and Alternative Communication Nonverbal persons with autism can benefit from a variety of augmentative and alternative communicative (AAC) devices and methods. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is among the most commonly used with children and adults who have little or no verbal ability. Therapists, teachers and parents help the child or adult build a vocabulary and consistently articulate desires, observations and feelings through pictures. This system can be taught and used at home, in the classroom and a variety of other settings.

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